B Visa

B2 Visa

I have a B1,B2 visa issued in 1992, valid "indefinitley", allowing me to stay in the US for up to 6 months. Is this visa still valid today?

I have never heard of a "indefinite" visa. You should call the local US consulate in your country before you travel.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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B2 -- unlawful presence

I have a B2 visa until Jan 2012. I had an approved H1 visa last year while I am here in the USA. But I have to get it from my home country , while my I-94 has expired already. As advised, I won't be able to come back since I overstayed my allowable I-94 duration. Being out-of-status already, what else can I do to make my stay here legalized? Can another employer like a school provide sponsorship?

Once you have accrued unlawful presence of over 180 days/one year, you become subject to 3/10 year bar from reentering USA. That is a very difficult position to be in. I suggest you speak with a lawyer about your situation. Read my blog for understanding more about unlawful presence.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Effective date on I-94 for a visitors visa

My parents came to US in 2009 to visit me. The effective date on I-94 form allowed them to stay in US for 7 months. After they left US, customer collected the forms and left no evidences about the effective date approved by immigration officer at customer in SFO airport. Now, they were rejected for new visa application to come to US due to this problem. How should we work it out with visa officer for this problem?

The usual time is 6, not 7 months. That could be part of the problem. If CBP gave them more time than is usual, your parents must not be penalized for it. In my view, contacting your Congressmen would help you.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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May B-1/B-2, E-1, E-2, F-1, H-1, J-1, L-1 O-1 visa or TN holder apply for green card?

May B-1/B-2, E-1, E-2, F-1, H-1, J-1, L-1 O-1 visa or TN holder apply for green card?

One of the questions I am asked quite frequently is whether or not an E-1/E-2 visa holder can apply for a green card and not jeopardize his or her E status. The answer is PROBABLY yes he can.

In the E visa context, this is what the govt says:

Quote:
9 FAM 41.51 N15 INTENT TO DEPART UPON TERMINATION OF STATUS
(TL:VISA-404; 04-29-2002)

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Applying for green card while on a B-1 or B-2 visa

1) I am a US Citizen. My parents (or spouse/spouse-to-be) are in USA on visitors visa. Can I apply for their green card? How does it all work? 2) My parents' I-130 application is currently pending. They are currently living in their home country, India. Can they visit me during the pendency of the green card application? 3) Is it better to apply for adjustment of status or consular processing for the last step of their green card? 4) Updated FAQ - My parent came to US with B1 visa and they are still here. But the visa were expired several years ago. Now I am a citizen, I wonder if I can still apply for green card for them. Could I apply by myself or need to consult with a lawyer?

A1. There is nothing that stops you from applying for their green card. Note also that the same answer applies to children and spouse of a US citizens. But it does NOT apply to brothers/sisters.

There is just one issue. It is INAPPROPRIATE (may be even illegal) for a person to enter USA on a tourist or other similar visa if they have the intent to apply for a green card. BUT, if they enter USA without that intent, and after a few days of entry change their mind, that is perfectly appropriate and legal.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Visa after B-1 to F-1 conversion

I entered the US on a B1/B2 visa in febuary 2007, and then changed my status to F1 in May 2007. I enrolled into a 1 year certificate diploma program and started attending school in June 2007. I completed the program and in Fall 2008, I transfered and enrolled into a Master's program at a prestigious university. I have completed 1 year of study and I am half way through the program. I am intending to visit my home country this summer. I would like to know the procedure to obtain the F1 visa stamping. I wish to travel and come back while I am a student. I have obtained my SSN and my Driver's License as well. I have also signed a lease for my apt for the next 1 year. I have always maintained legal status till date. I have working on campus for the last 6 months. I would like to know about the chances of getting my visa stamped before coming back to continue my studies. I am very confused listening to people and I really need some good advice. Its been close to 3 years now and I really wish i can get to see my family back home. I will really appreciate any advices and help. I dont know what kind of questions will be asked in the interview. Also the probability or obtaining the visa stamp. Please tell me what is the best way to approach this and the best thing that I can do.

Chances of getting an F-1 visa are remote. I would want you to reconsider the trip. The biggest problem here is, unless you declared to the consulate that you intended to convert from B to F status, they are likely to consider you to have misrepresented your true intention when you obtained/traveled on B visa.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Entering on/applying for nonimmigrant visa while green card is pending

I filed I-130 for my parents in April 09 which is still pending. They have 5 years multiple visa and they been here 4-5 times already. Is it ok for them to visit for a month again while their I-130 is still in pending status?

The answer is it is unlikely, but not impossible, that they will be permitted entry if CBP finds out about the I-130. If it were my own parents, I would probably not take the chance.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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New H-1 employee returning -- rights and issues

Our employee XYZ has arrived in the US. However, it appears that because of the job market in the US, he is going to return home to his old job. I know you said they are allowed to return back to USA at a later date if they choose to work for us down the road. But my question is how long may he stay without getting paid until he must return home? I know you sent me information about benching, stating: Q. What is the law regarding the benching of H-1 holding employees? A. The law does NOT permit benching without full salary payment by the employer. The only exception is that when an employer first hires an employee on H-1B they are allowed an initial period of 30 or 60 days during which the employee does not have to be paid while on bench. i. If the employee is currently in USA and adjusts status or transfers from one employer to another within USA - the bench-without-pay period is 60 days from the date of approval of the petition by INS. ii. If the employee is entering USA from abroad, the period is 30 days from the date of entry into USA. If I'm interpreting this correctly, we must pay him no later than day 30 of his arrival here in the USA?

There are a couple of issues I want to clarify. The period of payment begins on the earlier of the two events: when the employee presents himself/herself for the job or 30/60 days. DOL considers it to be irrefutable evidence of having reported when a consulting company starts "marketing" the resume (Note also that to bring an employee in without a project has been elevated by this administration to be an indictable offense, which I think is unlikely to stand up in courts).

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Inviting parents to provide care during pregnancy or postnatal period

Here's the situation: LPR wife is pregnant, currently visiting her in-laws overseas. The LPR husband will travel overseas later to see his parents and both husband and wife will travel back to U.S together. The couple wants to invite husband's mother who has been rejected twice for a visit visa for tourism purposes. Last rejection was more than a year ago.

Q1. Should the mother take visa appointment for interview before her son arrives overseas to see her so she can tell interviewing officer that she wants to see her son in the States in addition to tourism purposes. This may make her case stronger as a mother wants to see her son.

A1.
I am never in favor of trying to manipulate consulates. This could be considered outright fraud. Let us not go this way. Tell the truth. But, do let the consulate know that she is coming as a grandma - not a care taker or a health care employee.
 

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Can B visa holder convert to F or other status?

My question is that i have just entered USA on B1 /B2 visa on February 21 and sir now I am planning to stay here in USA...I am planning to carry on my further studies in Bridgeport university my arrival is for 3 months and I want to complete this procedure as soon as possible because I don't want to take the law in my hands

While it is permissible to change from one status to another from within U.S., it may not always be advisable.

Typically, when someone enters the U.S., supposedly for a short visit (e.g. B-1 or B-2) and then tries to change it to a longer term visa (F-1, L-1, H-1, etc.), USCIS often frowns upon it (and may not grant it), but the consulates invariably frown upon it. My recommendation in most of these cases is to avoid this type of change. If you have already obtained the change, it may be very difficult to procure a visa whenever you need to travel abroad.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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