Sample Cases from our office

These are some sample cases from our files. It is impossible for us to present all have done past over 15 years of our practice. But these were some cases that came to mind when we started writing this column 2-3 years ago.

We filed an H-1B petition for a company that provides IT related services, on behalf of the beneficiary, a  software developer. An RFE was subsequently issued, responded to and then denied as failing to prove that petitioner established that sufficient speciality occupation work was available and that the position qualified as a specialty occupation. We filed an appeal with the Administrative Appeals Office, the appeal was sustained and the petition was remanded back for issuance of an approval notice. During the following months multiple attempts were made by counsel and petitioner to determine and expedite the processing of the approval notice. After approximately six months of delay in issuance of the notice, we filed a complaint with a United States District Court. We were able to successfully argue that this was an unreasonable delay. The case was settled and approximately ten days after filing the case the approval notice was issued.

Status: We were able to successfully argue that this was an unreasonable delay. The case was settled and approximately ten days after filing the case the approval notice was issued.

DISCLAIMER: PAST APPROVAL OF A CASE IS NOT A GUARANTEE OR PREDICTION REGARDING THE OUTCOME OF FUTURE CASES. CASE RESULTS DEPEND UPON A VARIETY OF FACTORS UNIQUE TO EACH CASE.

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We responded to a Form I-485 Request for Evidence to prove that approximately a decade ago the permanent residency applicant had, in fact, attended two U.S. universities as he had claimed in previously approved petitions. Both universities had been certified by ICE under its Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) during the applicant’s attendance. Subsequent to his having transferred from one university to the other, from which the applicant then obtained a graduate degree, and after he no longer had any association with either universities, ICE withdrew its SEVP certification from both universities. The documents requested by USCIS dated back to over a decade. Fortunately the applicant had retained many documents that indicated he had in fact attended both universities and relied upon the universities and their Designated School Officials who administer the SEVP and provide information and guidance to the students. We also pointed out to the government that even if USCIS found that the applicant had violated his visa status he remained eligible for an exemption under the regulations  and that  discretionary approval was warranted in this case. While we were unable to provide all documents required given the time that had lapsed, a few weeks after filing, the applicant’s Green Card was approved.

Status: While we were unable to provide all documents required given the time that had lapsed, a few weeks after filing, the applicant’s Green Card was approved.

DISCLAIMER: PAST APPROVAL OF A CASE IS NOT A GUARANTEE OR PREDICTION REGARDING THE OUTCOME OF FUTURE CASES. CASE RESULTS DEPEND UPON A VARIETY OF FACTORS UNIQUE TO EACH CASE.

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We filed an H-1B extension petition for a small software company that offers customer software and technology solutions to the local clientele. USCIS approved the classification portion of the petition, but denied the portion of the petition requesting an extension of stay. USCIS stated that beneficiary had failed to maintain his nonimmigrant status because his H-1B status had expired prior to the filing of the H-1B extension petition and he was only  in an authorized period of stay because of a pending extension request from the previous employer. We filed a lawsuit with a United States District Court. We argued that in denying the period of authorized stay, while the previously filed H-1B was pending, USCIS misinterpreted their own regulation. The case was settled in a few weeks and the petition was approved with extension of stay and for the entire requested duration without a gap in the employee’s status.

Status: The case was settled in a few weeks and the petition was approved with extension of stay and for the entire requested duration without a gap in the employee’s status.

DISCLAIMER: PAST APPROVAL OF A CASE IS NOT A GUARANTEE OR PREDICTION REGARDING THE OUTCOME OF FUTURE CASES. CASE RESULTS DEPEND UPON A VARIETY OF FACTORS UNIQUE TO EACH CASE.

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Category: ICE, USCIS, Form I-485, SEVP

We responded to a Form I-485 Request for Evidence to prove that approximately a decade ago the permanent residency applicant had, in fact, attended two U.S. universities as he had claimed in previously approved petitions. Both universities had been certified by ICE under its Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) during the applicant’s attendance. Subsequent to his having transferred from one university to the other, from which the applicant then obtained a graduate degree, and after he no longer had any association with either universities, ICE withdrew its SEVP certification from both universities. The documents requested by USCIS dated back to over a decade. Fortunately the applicant had retained many documents that indicated he had attended both universities in good faith and relied upon the universities and their Designated School Officials who administer SEVP and provide information and guidance to the students.  We also pointed out to the government that even if USCIS found that the applicant had violated his visa status he remained eligible for an exemption under the regulations  and that  discretionary approval was warranted in this case. While we were unable to provide all documents required given the time that had lapsed, a few weeks after filing, the applicant’s Green Card was approved.

Status: While we were unable to provide all documents required given the time that had lapsed, a few weeks after filing, the applicant’s Green Card was approved.

 

DISCLAIMER: PAST APPROVAL OF A CASE IS NOT A GUARANTEE OR PREDICTION REGARDING THE OUTCOME OF FUTURE CASES. CASE RESULTS DEPEND UPON A VARIETY OF FACTORS UNIQUE TO EACH CASE.

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In this case, the petitioning green card holder filed forms I-130 and I-485 for her second husband, whom she had been married to for less than five years since obtaining her lawful permanent resident status based on her first marriage, which was to a U.S. citizen. That marriage ended in a divorce. In such instances there is a rebuttable presumption that the prior marriage was fraudulent.  There is an exception if five years have passed from the petitioner's adjustment or if the petitioner can prove by clear and convincing evidence that the first marriage was entered into as a bona fide marriage. A notice of intent to deny (NOID) was issued following the couple’s interview with a Service Officer.  Since five years had not passed, we assisted Petitioner in responding to the NOID and proving by clear and convincing evidence that her prior marriage was not fraudulent. The detailed response included many documents regarding the bona fide nature of the first marriage, such as photographs, extensive wedding and pre and post wedding details along with many affidavits. We requested USCIS to withdraw its intention to deny and resume processing. Shortly after filing the NOID response, Beneficiary received his green card.

Status: We requested USCIS to withdraw its intention to deny and resume processing. Shortly after filing the NOID response, Beneficiary received his green card.

 

DISCLAIMER: PAST APPROVAL OF A CASE IS NOT A GUARANTEE OR PREDICTION REGARDING THE OUTCOME OF FUTURE CASES. CASE RESULTS DEPEND UPON A VARIETY OF FACTORS UNIQUE TO EACH CASE.

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