Visa FAQs

Correcting names on passports, visas, and other documents

Authored on: Mon, 12/20/2021 - 09:05

Question

This question is related to getting an FNU (First Name Unknown) removed from a green card and updated with the correct first name. In my wife's passport, the last name is empty and the first and last name is combined as Given Name. So in the green card, FNU is given as her first Name and full Name as last name. We are planning to update the Indian passport with a split name correction.

I understand that we need to file an I-90 for a name change. Since this is a split name correction, do we need to get the county court certification for name update, or is just presenting the updated passport with name correction (with first and last name mentioned) enough? Is any other documentation required? 

While the name correction is being processed  with USCIS will there be any issues traveling outside the country?

 

Answer

Video URL

It is not illegal to travel while you are trying to do a name change. She should be okay as long as she can prove she is the same person., She may be delayed, probably because they put her in secondary inspection when she returns. 

 

National Interest Exemption for Visas – For Students

Authored on: Fri, 06/04/2021 - 06:05

Question

Today I got NIE waiver approval from the US consulate. They sent the approval mail with a passport number. I have a valid USA visa. I am planning to travel back to the USA in a week. What doc's required to travel ? or NIE waiver is sufficient?

Answer

You have not told us what type of visa you possess. In addition to the NIE, you must meet all the usual requirements for your visa type.

Note: For the NRI readers, The Economic Times has started an immigration helpdesk. A team of experts which includes Rajiv S. Khanna will address the most pressing issues. Please see the link below.

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/nri/migrate/nri-helpdesk-all-you-need-to-know-about-the-current-situation-for-f-1-and-j-1-visas/articleshow/83171279.cms

Visas for same-sex partners from countries where such marriage is not allowed

Authored on: Wed, 02/12/2020 - 00:39

Question

My partner is a teacher and was granted a J-1 visa on September 25, 2019. We've been together under one roof for 5 years and undergone the rite of Holy Union since same-sex marriage is not honored in the Philippines. I would like to seek advice on the best possible way on how to go to the US. Should I still push through with the J-2 visa application or as a tourist or visitor?

Answer

Watch the Video on this FAQ: Visas for same-sex partners from

countries where such marriage is not allowed

Video Transcript:

In these cases B-2 visa can be extended as long as the J-1 holder is in the USA. FAQ in detail...




Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

Is there any law to provide legal stay to the parent of US citizen child with disability?

Authored on: Thu, 05/24/2018 - 03:54

Question

My spouse and I are staying in the USA since last 10 years on work visa H-1B. We have our second daughter born in 2016 who is facing neurological disability which requires long term care and constant therapies. The current scenario is my husband's H-1B has denied and couldn't get back to the USA. I am here in the USA with my both kids on B2 Visa. My both kids are US Citizens. Is there any legislation which can provide legal stay to the parent of a child with disability in the USA?

Answer

Video URL

 

Immigration Consequences of a Denial of Entry at the Airport

Authored on: Mon, 10/23/2017 - 08:44

Question

I had been travelling to the US on a tourist visa for all my life, in 2008 I had to travel out of the country and when I returned to the US, in the Minneapolis checkpoint they found a pay stub from my work which I obviously shouldn't have had since I didn't have a work permit, they took away my tourist visa and made me sign what looked like a "voluntary departure" or "refusal of entry" I really can't remember exactly the term that I signed and was returned to MX the next day. <br>

My questions are:<br>
1. Is there a website where I can see if I was penalized? <br>
2. Will I be able to solicit another tourist visa? <br>
3. If the answer to the above question is yes, given the political climate, do you think it is a good idea to go through the whole process again or would it just be a waste of money?<br>
4. My father has become a US citizen, I'm unmarried, can he request citizenship for me or residency? approximately how long is the process?

Answer

Watch the Video on this FAQ: Immigration consequences of a denial of entry at the airport

Video Transcript:

1. You can file a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with Department of Homeland Security (DHS) or U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and or USCIS and see what information they have on you and within a few months they should be able to give you a copy of your document everything that they have on you and this doesn't cost you anything.

2. Do remember tourist visa is not a guarantee. The consular officer could refuse you a tourist visa for many reasons, so even if the fact that you worked without authorization on a previous time is long gone the prior bad history could be used to deny you another tourist visa.

3. As long as you don't lie about anything, by all means, you can try.

4. You have to go through green card and it takes many, many years. So if you go to the visa bulletin there is a category for unmarried children of US citizens and it takes several years. More...

 

Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

Exemption from H-1 Quota and Visa Stamping

Authored on: Tue, 07/11/2017 - 08:13

Question

In 2014, My wife was working with employer "A" on L2 EAD and the employer "A" filed H1B petition in April-2014. She got approval notice in May-2014 but due to some family reasons we have to go back to India and she continues working for the same employer from India since then. Her approved H1B petition with the same employer "A" is valid till Aug-2017 and H1B visa is stamped in Dec-2016 for the same employer "A". She never traveled to the USA on that H1B visa as her employer does not have any opportunity there. Since she never traveled to the USA on her H1B visa ever, does that mean she has never granted status as an H1B Non-immigrant?

Answer

Watch the Video on this FAQ: Exemption from H-1 quota, Visa stamped, did not join employer

Video Transcript

I personally feel once your case is approved on October 1st, you should be exempt from the quota. If you are outside the USA and you do not get a visa stamp, the government takes the position that you are not yet exempted from the H-1 quota. More...

Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

Is it legal to do business in home country while working in USA on a visa?

Authored on: Fri, 04/07/2017 - 00:17

Question

I am a Canadian citizen currently working in the U.S. with a TN visa.

I am planning to start a Canadian business part time with a partner in Canada (also a Canadian citizen).

I've read that starting a U.S. business is not allowed while I'm working in the States with a TN visa, but I cannot find sufficient information online about whether I can operate a Canadian business part time while I am in the states as a Canadian citizen.

Answer

Watch the Video on this FAQ: Is it legal to do business in home country while working in the USA on a visa?

Video Transcript

If there is no connection with the USA and the business is conducted totally outside the USA you can certainly work out. More

Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.


English Language Exemption for VisaScreen for Nurses

Authored on: Wed, 03/08/2017 - 05:40

Question

I have an inquiry about the section that says:<br>
Additionally, applicants graduating from an entry-level program accredited by the National League for Nursing Accreditation Commission (NLNAC) or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) are exempt from the English language proficiency-testing requirement.<br>

If this is true then the program I graduated from is CCNE accredited. Is this included in the USCIS law if yes so that I check with the CGFNS how to proceed because in the visa screen section they don't mention being graduate of an accredited school as an exempt?

Answer

For VisaScreen --

Applicants educated in specific countries where English is both the native language and the language of classroom and textbook instruction (see below) are exempt from having to take an English language proficiency examination. For you to be exempt, you must meet BOTH of the following criteria:

1. your country of entry-level education was in United Kingdom (England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland), Australia, Canada (except for Quebec), New Zealand, Ireland or the United States, and

2. the language of textbooks and verbal instruction of your education was English.

Exemption is not automatic because you meet all the criteria, CGFNS/ICHP must review your educational documents to determine exemption. IF CGFNS/ICHP determines you are not exempt, you will receive a letter.

Visa Is In An Expired Passport

Authored on: Tue, 07/12/2016 - 04:07

Question

If my visa is in an expired passport, what should I do?

Answer

If your Visa is in a passport that has expired or will expire within 6 months of the end of your U.S. visit, you will need to get a new passport. However, you do not need to apply for a new visa. Just bring both your NEW and  passport with the valid visa to present to the CBP Officer when you arrive in the U.S. 

*Note:  Your ESTA is not a U.S. Visa.  If you obtain a new passport, you are required to apply for a brand new ESTA.  To re-apply visit esta.cbp.dhs.gov.

The U.S. has an agreement with certain countries exempting their citizens from the requirement that their passports be valid for up to six months past the end of their U.S. visit. (See page 19 of the Carrier Information Guide on cbp.gov).Citizens of the countries which are exempt the six-month rule need to have a passport valid for their intended period of stay.

Please contact the U.S. Embassy in your country of citizenship to determine if you are exempt from this requirement. 

Six-Month Club Update (Countries that Extend Passport Validity For an Additional Six Months After Expiration)

Birth certificate late registration and secondary evidence

Authored on: Mon, 12/21/2015 - 04:53

Question

I have a delayed birth registration certificate issued by municipal authority with place of birth: hospital name, city. My passport just got the city name as place of birth. Do I need to submit secondary evidence when I file I-485 because of delayed registration?

Answer

See clip from Attorney Rajiv S. Khanna's conference call video that addresses this question.

https://youtu.be/1QbgUmUUJvc?t=1405

FAQ Transcript:

In many countries especially India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, it can happen that the birth occurred much earlier but the registration of the birth was done much later. Remember it was not the law that you have to register every birth, it was a voluntary action. So if a child was born in 1980 or 1970 you registered the birth in 2015 because that’s when you needed to get the green card. Now those are not acceptable registration. What you should do in those cases is get a letter from the municipal corporation, or local government, that says before this was registered there was no other registration. Like a non-availability before the registration. Along with that get two affidavits, from your parents or other people, who were alive when you were born, that will take care of it.

Secondary evidence becomes acceptable only when you can’t get non-availability from the municipal corporation and that’s a much more complicated area. I think you should get the non-availability.