Naturalization

How To Add Forgotten Information On To A Naturalization Application/N-400?

I filed for my N-400 and then had requested my Driver's History from NJ DMV just to be sure that my account is in good standing. I received my Driver's History after few weeks and my account is good standing, however, I had one traffic ticket 16 years ago about which I had completely forgotten to mention on my N-400. Therefore on my N-400 I had selected "No" to the citation question.
My question - should I let the officer know right in the beginning of the interview that I would like to amend my N-400 for that particular question OR should I wait until he gets to that question and then let him know? What's the best way to deal with this error on the application?

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Substantial transcription for video: 

Discussion Topics, Thursday 21 June 2018:

FAQ: Changing jobs after I 140 approval || Can a green card be filed for me if I am on H4 or L2 or F1 – – any status other than H-1B or L-1A? || Can an employee withdraw an H-1B petition? || How to add forgotten information on to a naturalization application/N-400? Other: Changing jobs when an appeal to the Department of Labor (BALCA) is pending || Trading stocks while on H-1B or H4 status || Changing from H-1B to F1 status and back to H-1B again || How to extend my I 94 within the USA? || Obtaining EB2 with a three year degree || Procedure after a denied PERM is approved || Validity of I 140 after I 485 denial || Minimizing the future impact of an L-1A denial || Exemption from H-1B quota where visa is stamped but never joined the employer || WHD complaint against employer || Green card processing times || Receiving pension after surrender or loss of green card || Challenging wage levels determined by an employer || India EB-1 priority dates || Traffic violations in N400 || Checking status of PERM, etc.

USCIS Redesigns Citizenship and Naturalization Certificates

WASHINGTON — U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) began issuing redesigned Certificates of Citizenship and Naturalization today, following a successful pilot in four USCIS field offices and one service center. The redesign of these eight certificates is one of the many ways USCIS is working to combat fraud and safeguard the legal immigration system. 

Agency: 
Citizenship and Naturalization: 
Substantial transcription for video: 

Discussion Topics, Thursday 26 April 2018:

FAQ: Must I carry my green card with me at all times? ||H-1B and green card transfer from a non-profit organization to for-profit||Filing EB-5 investor case with a promissory note secured by property in a foreign country||At what stage should I join my future green card employer?||Child turning 21, immigration consequences for pending green card cases

Other: Compelling circumstances EAD after the age of 21 ||National interest waiver, J1 visa and physicians ||Immigration consequences of amending tax returns||ACICS Accreditation restored, effect on STEM OPT extension ||Advisability of travel using AVR – automatic visa revalidation ||Transferring H-1B quota case before first October ||Naturalization for a developmentally disabled applicant ||H4 EAD ||H-1B extension with PERM || Rules for AOS EAD extension, etc

USCIS Updates Webpage to Share More Accurate Processing Times

WASHINGTON—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) launched a pilot to test a redesigned processing times webpage that displays the data for all forms in an easier-to-read format and also tests a new way of collecting data and calculating the processing times for some forms.

Immigration Law : 
Agency: 
Citizenship and Naturalization: 

Form N-470

You stated : "The Form N-470 must be filed before the person departs from the United States except religious workers who may apply before or after departure, or after return to the United States. The religious workers are not required to have lived in the United States for a specific period of time prior to the filing of N-470. Similar exception is granted to alien members of the U.S. Armed Forces. In such cases the LPR employee who filed N-470 is considered physically present in the US during such employment abroad and does not need a reentry permit."
Does that mean a religious worker does not have to spend a full one uninterrupted year of physical presence in the US? If a religious worker can apply any time and once approved, all time spent outside of the US will be counted towards his naturalization qualification, it means that religious worker doesn't need to be physically present for a full year at any time prior to applying for his/her citizenship, correct?

The law says:

1. Generally, you must have been physically present and residing in the United States for an uninterrupted period, without any absences, for at least one year after your admission as a lawful permanent resident before you can file Form N-470.

2. You do not have to be in the United States to file Form N-470, but you must file it before you have been absent from the United States for a continuous period of one year.

 

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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