CBP

CBP requirements for a B-2 visitor

While previous presence in the U.S. is a relevant factor in determining whether an alien maintains a residence abroad that he or she has no intention of abandoning, isn't it true that inspecting CBP officers should not focus solely on the amount of time an individual has previously spent in the United States to determine eligibility for admission as a visitor?

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) indicates that all nonimmigrant applicants seeking admission as B-2 visitors are required to satisfy the inspecting CBP Officer that they are entitled to the admission and classification that they seek, including proving that they maintain a foreign residence abroad that they have no intention of abandoning.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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CBP and 180-day admission period for B-2 visitor

1. If an alien is otherwise admissible as a B-2 visitor for pleasure, isn't it true that a CBP officer should not limit the admission of that alien to 180 days in a twelve-month period? 2. Assuming an individual is otherwise eligible for admission, isn't it true that eligibility for admission as a visitor is determined by the nature and expected duration of the intended activity in the U.S.? 3. What is the training that is given to CBP officers to reinforce that B-2 visitors may lawfully be admitted for an aggregate period in excess of 180 days in a twelve-month period?

1. U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) indicates that, if an alien applicant is otherwise admissible as a B-2 visitor, and passport validity requirements are met, the applicant can be issued more than one 180-day admission period in a 12-month period.  

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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B-1 Visa removed and cancelled by CBP

If a Mexican B-1 truck driver has his/her B-1 Visa removed and cancelled by CBP for a Point-to-Point violation and wants to challenge that determination, whom should that person contact at CBP?

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) indicates that a Mexican truck driver whose B-1 visa has been cancelled by CBP for a point-to-point violation will need to discuss the issue of the cancellation with the U.S. Consulate in Mexico.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Unlawful Presence

If a Canadian does not have a Form I-94, does he not accrue unlawful presence until there is a finding that he violated the terms of his nonimmigrant alien status? Is the burden is on CBP to establish such a violation occurred?

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) indicates that the mere fact that there is no I-94 does not determine whether or not an individual overstays. Moreover, an individual who is admitted as a B, but does not receive an I-94 either on the southern or northern border is in a legally materially different status than an individual who is admitted as duration of status.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Global Entry Trusted Traveler Program Expedites International Travel, Reciprocates with South Korea

Using the Global Entry Trusted Traveler Program to expedite their clearance upon arriving in the U.S., more than a million international travelers have already substantially reduced their travel time.  Run by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the program streamlines the screening process at 25 U.S. international airports for pre-approved international travelers using biometric identification.  Participants use automated kiosks to present their machine-readable passport or U.S. permanent resident card, use the scanner for fingerprint verification, and make a customs declaration.

Agency: 
Immigration Law : 

CBP Reminds Travelers What to 'Know Before You Go'

Summer is one of the busiest international travel times in the U.S. and with the start of the travel season this Memorial Day, U.S. Customs and Border Protection is reminding travelers of some important tips. With increasing passenger volumes due to a nine percent increase in travel and tourism since February 2011, there are things returning U.S. citizens or residents, and international visitors can do to help speed their processing.

Agency: 
Immigration Law : 

The United States and Canada Announce Plans to Increase NEXUS Benefits

(Tuesday, May 08, 2012)

Washington— U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) announced today they are delivering on key commitments under the U.S.-Canada Beyond the Border Action Plan for Perimeter Security and Economic Competiveness—increasing benefits to NEXUS members, streamlining the NEXUS membership renewal process and launching a plan to increase NEXUS membership. ( NEXUS Program )

Agency: 
Immigration Law : 

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