General Green Card

Fingerprinting for US Immigration

USCIS requires applicants and petitioners for certain immigration benefits to be fingerprinted for the purpose of conducting FBI criminal background checks. To better ensure both the quality and integrity of the process, USCIS processes fingerprint cards for immigration benefits only if an authorized fingerprint site prepares them. Authorized fingerprint sites include USCIS offices, Application Support Centers (ASCs), and U.S. consular offices and military installations abroad. In general, USCIS schedules people to be fingerprinted at an authorized fingerprint site after an application or petition is filed. USCIS charges a set fee per person (for most applicants) at the time of filing for this fingerprinting service. Please check the instructions on your Immigration application or petition form to find out if you must be fingerprinted.

The following three points apply for all immigration benefits applications (see exceptionsbelow) requiring an FD-258 fingerprint check filed with USCIS after March 29, 1998:

  1. Do not submit a completed fingerprint card (FD-258) with your application. Your application will be accepted without the fingerprint card attached. If you submit a completed fingerprint card with your application on or after March 29, 1998, the card will be rejected and you will be scheduled to be fingerprinted by USCIS.
  2. Do submit fee, in addition to the application fee, payable to USCIS, with your application. The fee is noted at the top of our Forms and Fees page. This charge will cover the cost for you to be fingerprinted by USCIS.
  3. After USCIS receives your application, USCIS will provide you with an appointment letter with the location of the nearest USCIS authorized fingerprint site. Please read the instructions in the appointment letter, and take it to USCIS authorized fingerprint site when you go to your fingerprint appointment.

Exceptions:

Applicants and petitioners residing abroad who are fingerprinted at a United States consular or military installation abroad do not need to be fingerprinted by USCIS and are exempt from the fingerprint fee. These applicants and petitioners must file their completed card at the time their application or petition is filed.

The following forms are subject to exceptions to the above requirements.  

To find the Application Support Centers (ASCs) closest to you, see the "USCIS Service and Office Locator" page. You can also call our toll free number at 1-800-375-5283.

 

 

Related links

 

Special Fingerprint Instructions for Form I-600, "Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative (Orphan Petition)," and Form I-600A, "Application for Advance Processing of Orphan Petition (Advance Processing Application)"

 

Safety & Security of U.S. Borders: Biometrics

 

Fingerprints & Other Biometrics

 

Identification Record Request/Criminal Background Check

 

Upgrade to 10-Fingerprint Collection

 

Biometrics -DHS

 

Immigration Law : 
Green Card: 

Guestbook Entry for Suki Baldwin, United States

Name: 
Suki Baldwin
Green Card: 
State: 
Illinois
Nonimmigrant Visas: 
Country: 
United States
Comment: 
Our office works regularly and closely with the Law Offices of Rajiv S. Khanna, PC, with both H1B and Permanent Resident applications.  We do not have any complaints at all – our case managers are smart, fast, conscientious, polite, and very pleasant to work with.  We treasure them!  I myself have worked mainly with Fran Fisher and Heather Riddick, and to a lesser degree with Anna Baker.  I don’t know how we could speak more highly of them or of Mr. Khanna’s law firm.  We appreciate them greatly!

USCIS Implements Help HAITI Act of 2010

Green Card Through the Help Haiti Act of 2010

 

On December 9, 2010, President Obama signed into law the Help Haitian Adoptees Immediately to Integrate Act of 2010 (Help HAITI Act of 2010). This new law will make it possible for certain Haitian orphans paroled into the United States to become lawful permanent residents (LPR) of the United States and get green cards. Applications to get a green card under this law may be filed at any time on or before December 9, 2013.

Agency: 

Guestbook Entry for Sami, United States

Name: 
Sami
State: 
Florida
Profession/Occupation: 
Glossary: 
Country: 
United States
Comment: 
I came to the United States by an H1B visa. The H1 visa was filed through my company’s attorney which later I asked them to apply for my green card as well. Unfortunately, the attorney made several mistakes and I cancelled my contract with them. After some research and asking from friends and colleagues, I decided to go with the Law Offices of Rajiv S. Khanna whose web site, immigration.com is well known. Obviously the cost was higher than our company’s attorney but I used to hear lots of sad stories about how some unexperienced attornies lost the customer’s hope, time, and money. So, I think it was really worth it because last week I received my green card after less than 3 years. This is a very good record for EB2 category. Another Iranian friend of mine took about 7 years to get his GC! Heather Riddick, Art Shifflett, Mathew Chacko, and Rajiv Khanna worked on my cases during this time and I am extremely satisfied by their experience, knowledge, care, and accuracy. Cheers to all of them and thanks again!

Guestbook Entry for Durga, United States

Name: 
Durga
Nonimmigrant Visas: 
Green Card: 
State: 
Michigan
Country: 
United States
Comment: 
This is to share my experience with all of you who are anxious about various issues with immigration processes. We recently contacted Rajiv’s firm for guidance in our case. I consider myself very forthright when it comes to my opinions and valuesystem.  My small step of seeking their assistance led to great strides in terms of my confidence and optimism. I mean it. I personally feel the consultation with Rajiv has tremendously helped get clarity and direction. Normally we are vary of approaching attorneys with our ignorance regarding the legal issues. Interacting with different levels of knowledge and on diffrent planes of understanding is normally not very comfortable. All such discomfort was dispelled in my very first consultation with Mr Khanna. I felt he is a professional with a sensitivity towards naive clients.  I felt he showed a very authentic and a genuine concern to understand where a person is coming from. That human touch sometimes has a huge bearing on our sense of hope and life in general. Expertise, knowledge in just hands, with a nice human being. With a competent and an understanding individual at the helm one would be in stronger starting place to pursue one’s objectives. I vouch for that. His team members Suman Bhasin, Leslie, Chengappa also are competent, courteous, and prompt. I am happy to associate with them.

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