Legal Rights/Benefits of Green Card Compared to H-1B

After getting GC (emp based):
1. If an employee is working for an end client (employer - vendor - end client): while employed with GC sponsor, can a person be on bench (no pay) for some time? or like H-1B, it's considered as out of status, risk of GC revocation?
2. Would like to travel to visit family abroad- At of POE, any questions by the officer ? Even though still employed, but not on a project at end client?
3. While applying for citizenship later, if W2 < LC salary for any given year, negative impact during interview?
4. Also, as a green card holder, can a person be self-employed(sole owner of LLC - and do 1099 contracting for US clients) ?
5. In above scenario, is it legal if you(LLC) did not make any revenue in between contracts?
6. Is it legal for GC holder to be unemployed, or like H-1B, if you are on bench or not getting paid by employer - you are out of status - hence risk of losing GC?

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ANSWER: 

Watch the Video on this FAQ: Legal rights/benefits of Green Card compared to H-1B

Video Transcript:

It is easier to define the rights of a GC holder in comparison to the rights of a U.S. citizen. You can pretty much do everything that the US citizen can do.

1. Of course, a US citizen can be on bench. no risk of green card revocation there.
2. Technically if you are gone for less than 6 months there shouldn't be too many questions.
3. Once you get your GC approval whether you get paid ten times more or less is irrelevant. 
4. You can be self-employed as a GC holder and you can do a 1099.
5. That's not a problem at all.
6. Yes, it is legal for a GC holder to be unemployed. More... 

 
 
Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.
Green Card: 
Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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