B-2 Visa

B-1/B-2 Extension for Autistic Child

Our office was retained to file a B-1/B-2 extension on behalf of a 34-year old male who was diagnosed with autism and requires ongoing supervision and monitoring. He is dependent on his mother, a permanent resident of the US, who is his legal guardian and only source of care. His father is a resident of Botswana.  Botswana regulations do not make provisions for a child above the age of 21 to reside in the country as a dependent. Even in the US, regulations do not consider children over the age of 21 to be dependents of their parents.

Nonimmigrant Visas: 

Guestbook Entry for Mita B., United States

Name: 
Mita B.
State: 
Missouri
Citizenship and Naturalization: 
Nonimmigrant Visas: 
Immigration.com: 
Country: 
United States
Comment: 

My question to Mr. Khanna was on B-2 visa application for my Mother while simultaneously applying for her immigrant visa petition and adjusting her status in the USA during her stay. Additionally, he has assisted me with my own Citizenship questions earlier. As always, Mr. Khanna provided me with valuable insights and information on how to proceed that would best benefit my situation and my Mother' case. What I liked most is, him being very punctual in getting back to delivering on promises and with accurate opinions. I applaud Mr. Khanna and his team for the work they are doing - helping so many people with their immigration needs. I would always feel comfortable knowing his services are excellent in getting the job done, on time! Thank you!

CBP requirements for a B-2 visitor

While previous presence in the U.S. is a relevant factor in determining whether an alien maintains a residence abroad that he or she has no intention of abandoning, isn't it true that inspecting CBP officers should not focus solely on the amount of time an individual has previously spent in the United States to determine eligibility for admission as a visitor?

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) indicates that all nonimmigrant applicants seeking admission as B-2 visitors are required to satisfy the inspecting CBP Officer that they are entitled to the admission and classification that they seek, including proving that they maintain a foreign residence abroad that they have no intention of abandoning.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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CBP and 180-day admission period for B-2 visitor

1. If an alien is otherwise admissible as a B-2 visitor for pleasure, isn't it true that a CBP officer should not limit the admission of that alien to 180 days in a twelve-month period? 2. Assuming an individual is otherwise eligible for admission, isn't it true that eligibility for admission as a visitor is determined by the nature and expected duration of the intended activity in the U.S.? 3. What is the training that is given to CBP officers to reinforce that B-2 visitors may lawfully be admitted for an aggregate period in excess of 180 days in a twelve-month period?

1. U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) indicates that, if an alien applicant is otherwise admissible as a B-2 visitor, and passport validity requirements are met, the applicant can be issued more than one 180-day admission period in a 12-month period.  

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Guestbook Entry for Mita, United States

Name: 
Mita
Profession/Occupation: 
Nonimmigrant Visas: 
State: 
Missouri
Country: 
United States
Comment: 

 I have worked with Mr. Khanna' Law Firm for over 12 years now, in many ways, either through having my questions answered (when I was still a student), to getting my work visa done, or most recently, for visitor' visa inquiries / clarifications. Mr. Khanna and his team, have ALWAYS provided me with their valuable time and advice very graciously. Their 15 minutes of a conference call time to answer / address a question / issue, mean a lot to people who are on the receiving end. While there are many Lawyers / Attorneys who provide such services to their communities, I hardly know of ANY Law Firm who do so regularly, have done so for many, many years, and will continue to provide such services even in the future, including to those who are NOT their clients. There could be many instances when an individual is not able to pay the consultation fees. If it is not an abuse of his time and a genuine, sincere request has been made, Mr. Khanna and team WILL work out a way to provide those consultation services free of cost. Why so? Because, this is THEIR PASSION, ... to help people in the community. I personally admire this gesture and professionalism. 

Very recently, I had specific and some general questions regarding B-2 visa RFE's for my Mother, who has been here under medical and humanitarian grounds, for quite a few years . This being the 2nd RFE that I have received, put me into some worries, questioning the Agency' motives as to why such RFE' after so long when all the required documents were handed to USCIS each time the application/petition was sent for a renewal. Clearly the Agency wants to get a clear picture about my Mother' health condition, and the costs associated with that and who is paying for her support so that she doesn't become a public burden. Her health condition doesn't allow for her to travel and the notion of her separation from me, due of the care that I give to her, makes her physical condition worse. Not to mention, that the most recent economic downturn has put me into some dire situations, conditions to provide for medical support. She did receive state' help for her medical expenses recently. I'm worried for this situation, which I wasn't earlier. It was for this reason, I contacted Mr. Khanna, and he provided me with his valuable answers, the best approach to answer such RFE, and what to do next.

I CANNOT thank Mr. Khanna and his whole team much. It was so nice to have talked with Rena W. after many years, and to know that some of the team members, like Ana B. with whom I had worked earlier, are still there, providing their excellent services.

I was first referred to Mr. Khanna by one of  my friends, who also got his work visa and permanent residency done through Mr. Khanna. I can certainly refer anyone, to Mr. Khanna' Immigration Offices, to receive excellent and prompt services, anytime, without any hesitation.

Thank you for all that you do, for the community and its people. My very best wishes.

 

Guestbook Entry for Sneha, United States

Name: 
Sneha
State: 
Philadelphia
Nonimmigrant Visas: 
Country: 
United States
Comment: 

Hi, I first of all like to appreciate the generosity of Mr Rajiv in replying to my email within 15min and then giving the phone conference appointment for no cost since I am a student. He is definitely a great person who really makes an effort to sort out others issues. I contacted him to know how my mom who already have visitor visa, can stay in US on continous basis as my dad recently passed away and I am the only child. I knew what he had suggested others who were on H1 visas and had same issues (by listening to the record of past tele conferences), but wanted to confirm his opinion in my case. He said that I can also do visitor visa extensions in lieu of F2 visas, but he was hesitant as how would I support the medical expense. I understand his concern, but I would be contacting him again as I really want this to work for my mom. Anyhow, I am really thankful to him and his staff for being so supportive and understanding. Wish the entire team good luck and high success.

B-2 to B-1

I am an IT professional who has come to the US for medical treatment on a B2. I am getting better. Since I like to constantly upgrade my skills, I found some training programs that I could attend as they are more frequent in the US than in Canada. Can I attend them on a B2? I mean I have a B1/B2 visa, but the officer marked it as B2 on the stamp on my passport at the POE. Second - I also have got an offer for a one day lecture to some technology professionals for which I might get paid. How would the folks know I worked for a day if while exiting the country there is no checking?

I believe you can take training on B-2 as long as your main purpose of stay in USA is is still medical treatment. Getting paid may be a bad idea.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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