H Visa Law

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Sec. 214.2(h) Temporary employees 


(1) Admission of temporary employees
    (i) General. Under section 101(a)(15)(H) of the Act, an alien may be authorized to come to the United States temporarily to perform services or labor for, or to receive training from, an employer, if petitioned for by that employer. Under this nonimmigrant category, the alien may be classified as follows: under section 101(a)(15)(H)(i)(c) of the Act as a registered nurse; under section 101(a)(15)(H)(i)(b) of the Act as an alien who is coming to perform services in a specialty occupation, services relating to a Department of Defense (DOD) cooperative research and development project or coproduction project, or services as a fashion model who is of distinguished merit and ability; under section 101(a)(15)(H)(ii)(a) of the Act as an alien who is coming to perform agricultural labor or services of a temporary or seasonal nature; under section 101(a)(15)(H)(ii)(b) of the Act as an alien coming to perform other temporary services or labor; or under section 101(a)(15)(H)(iii) of the Act as an alien who is coming as a trainee or as a participant in a special education exchange visitor program. These classifications are called H-1C, H-1B, H-2A, H-2B, and H-3, respectively. The employer must file a petition with the Service for review of the services or training and for determination of the alien's eligibility for classification as a temporary employee or trainee, before the alien may apply for a visa or seek admission to the United States. This paragraph sets forth the standards and procedures applicable to these classifications.(Amended 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107)  
    (ii) Description of classifications.  
        (A) An H-1C classification applies to an alien who is coming temporarily to the United States to perform services as a registered nurse, meets the requirements of section 212(m)(1) of the Act, and will perform services at a facility (as defined at section 212(m)(6) of the Act) for which the Secretary of Labor has determined and certified to the Attorney General that an unexpired attestation is on file and in effect under section 212(m)(2) of the Act. This classification will expire 4 years from June 11, 2001. (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107)(Revised 3/7/97; 62 FR 10422)  
        (B) An H-1B classification applies to an alien who is coming temporarily to the United States:  
            (1) To perform services in a specialty occupation (except agricultural workers, and aliens described in section 101(a)(15)(O) and (P) of the Act) described in section 214(i)(1) of the Act, that meets the requirements of section 214(i)(2) of the Act, and for whom the Secretary of Labor has determined and certified to the Attorney General that the prospective employer has filed a labor condition application under section 212(n)(1) of the Act; (Revised 3/7/97; 62 FR 10422)  
            (2) To perform services of an exceptional nature requiring exceptional merit and ability relating to a cooperative research and development project or a coproduction project provided for under a Government-to-Government agreement administered by the Secretary of Defense;  
            (3) To perform services as a fashion model of distinguished merit and ability and for whom the Secretary of Labor has determined and certified to the Attorney General that the prospective employer has filed a labor condition application under section 212(n)(1) of the Act.  
        (C) An H-2A classification applies to an alien who is coming temporarily to the United States to perform agricultural work of a temporary or seasonal nature.  
        (D) An H-2B classification applies to an alien who is coming temporarily to the United States to perform nonagricultural work of a temporary or seasonal nature, if there are not sufficient workers who are able, willing, qualified, and available at the time of application for a visa and admission to the United States and at the place where the alien is to perform such services or labor. This classification does not apply to graduates of medical schools coming to the United States to perform services as members of the medical profession. The temporary or permanent nature of the services or labor described on the approved temporary labor certification are subject to review by USCIS. This classification requires a temporary labor certification issued by the Secretary of Labor or the Governor of Guam prior to the filing of a petition with USCIS. (Revised effective 1/18/2009; 73 FR 78104)  
        (E) An H-3 classification applies to an alien who is coming temporarily to the United States:  
            (1) As a trainee, other than to receive graduate medical education or training, or training provided primarily at or by an academic or vocational institution, or  
            (2) As a participant in a special education exchange visitor program which provides for practical training and experience in the education of children with physical, mental, or emotional disabilities.  
 


(2) Petitions
    (i) Filing of petitions
        (A) General . A United States employer seeking to classify an alien as an H-1B, H-2A, H-2B, or H-3 temporary employee must file a petition on Form I-129, Petition for Nonimmigrant Worker, as provided in the form instructions. (Revised effective 1/17/2009; 73 FR 76891 ) (Revised 5/5/05; 70 FR 23775 ) (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 ) (Revised 3/7/97; 62 FR 10422 )  
        (B) Service or training in more than one location. A petition that requires services to be performed or training to be received in more than one location must include an itinerary with the dates and locations of the services or training and must be filed with USCIS as provided in the form instructions. The address that the petitioner specifies as its location on the Form I-129 shall be where the petitioner is located for purposes of this paragraph. (Revised effective 1/17/2009; 73 FR 76891)  
        (C) Services or training for more than one employer. If the beneficiary will perform nonagricultural services for, or receive training from, more than one employer, each employer must file a separate petition with USCIS as provided in the form instructions. (Revised effective 1/17/2009; 73 FR 76891)  
        (D) Change of employers. If the alien is in the United States and seeks to change employers, the prospective new employer must file a petition on Form I-129 requesting classification and an extension of the alien's stay in the United States. If the new petition is approved, the extension of stay may be granted for the validity of the approved petition. The validity of the petition and the alien's extension of stay must conform to the limits on the alien's temporary stay that are prescribed in paragraph (h)(13) of this section. Ex cept as provided by 8 CFR 274a.12(b)(21) or section 214(n) of the Act, 8 U.S.C. 1184(n), the alien is not authorized to begin the employment with the new petitioner until the petition is approved. An H-1C nonimmigrant alien may not change employers. (Revised effective 1/17/2009; 73 FR 76891) (Amended 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107) (Revised 3/7/97; 62 FR 10422)  
        (E) Amended or new petition. The petitioner shall file an amended or new petition, with fee, with the Service Center where the original petition was filed to reflect any material changes in the terms and conditions of employment or training or the alien's eligibility as specified in the original approved petition. An amended or new H-1C, H-1B, H-2A, or H-2B petition must be accompanied by a current or new Department of Labor determination. In the case of an H-1B petition, this requirement includes a new labor condition application. (Amended 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107).  
        (F) Agents as petitioners . A United States agent may file a petition in cases involving workers who are traditionally self-employed or workers who use agents to arrange short-term employment on their behalf with numerous employers, and in cases where a foreign employer authorizes the agent to act on its behalf. A United States agent may be: the actual employer of the beneficiary, the representative of both the employer and the beneficiary, or, a person or entity authorized by the employer to act for, or in place of, the employer as its agent. A petition filed by a United States agent is subject to the following conditions; (Paragraph (h)(2)(i)(F) revised 4/16/97; 62 FR 18508)  
            (1) An agent performing the function of an employer must guarantee the wages and other terms and conditions of employment by contractual agreement with the beneficiary or beneficiaries of the petition. The agent/employer must also provide an itinerary of definite employment and information on any other services planned for the period of time requested.  
            (2) A person or company in business as an agent may file the H petition involving multiple employers as the representative of both the employers and the beneficiary or beneficiaries if the supporti ng documentation includes a complete itinerary of services or engagements. The itinerary shall specify the dates of each service or engagement, the names and addresses of the actual employers, and the names and addresses of the establishment, venues, or locations where the services will be performed. In questionable cases, a contract between the employers and the beneficiary or beneficiaries may be required. The burden is on the agent to explain the terms and conditions of the employment and to provide any required documentation.  
            (3) A foreign employer who, through a United States agent, files a petition for an H nonimmigrant alien is responsible for complying with all of the employer sanctions provisions of section 274A of the Act and 8 CFR part 274a .  
        (G) Multiple H-1B petitions. An employer may not file, in the same fiscal year, more than one H-1B petition on behalf of the same alien if the alien is subject to the numerical limitations of section 214(g)(1)(A) of the Act or is exempt from those limitations under section 214(g)(5)(C) of the Act. If an H-1B petition is denied, on a basis other than fraud or misrepresentation, the employer may file a subsequent H-1B petition on behalf of the same alien in the same fiscal year, provided that the numerical limitation has not been reached or if the filing qualifies as exempt from the numerical limitation. Otherwise, filing more than one H-1B petition by an employer on behalf of the same alien in the same fiscal year will result in the denial or revocation of all such petitions. If USCIS believes that related entities (such as a parent company, subsidiary, or affiliate) may not have a legitimate business need to file more than one H-1B petition on behalf of the same alien subject to the numerical limitations of section 214(g)(1)(A) of the Act or otherwise eligible for an exemption under section 214(g)(5)(C) of the Act, USCIS may issue a request for additional evidence or notice of intent to deny, or notice of intent to revoke each petition. If any of the related entities fail to demonstrate a legitimate business need to file an H-1B petition on behalf of the same alien, all petitions filed on that alien's behalf by the related entities will be denied or revoked. (Added 3/24/08; 73 FR 15389)  
    (ii) Multiple beneficiaries . More than one beneficiary may be included in an H-1C, H-2A, H-2B, or H-3 petition if the beneficiaries will be performing the same service, or receiving the same training, for the same period of time, and in the same location. H-2A and H-2B petitions for workers from countries not designated in accordance with paragraph (h)(6)(i)(E) of this section should be filed separately. (Amended effective 1/18/2009; 73 FR 78104 ) (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 ) (Revised 12/4/95; 60 FR 62021 )  
    (iii) Naming beneficiaries . H-1B, H-1C, and H-3 petitions must include the name of each beneficiary. Except as provided in this paragraph (h), all H-2A and H-2B petitions must include the name of each beneficiary who is currently in the United States, but need not name any beneficiary who is not currently in the United States. Unnamed beneficiaries must be shown on the petition by total number. USCIS may require the petitioner to name H-2B beneficiaries where the name is needed to establish eligibility for H-2B nonimmigrant status. If all of the beneficiaries covered by an H-2A or H-2B temporary labor certification have not been identified at the time a petition is filed, multiple petitions for subsequent beneficiaries may be filed at different times but must include a copy of the same temporary labor certification. Each petition must reference all previously filed petitions associated with that temporary labor certification. All H-2A and H-2B petitions on behalf of workers who are not from a country that has been designated as a part icipating country in accordance with paragraphs (h)(5)(i)(F)( 1 ) or (h)(6)(i)(E)( 1 ) of this section must name all the workers in the petition who fall within these categories. All H-2A and H-2B petitions must state the nationality of all beneficiaries, whether or not named, even if there are beneficiaries from more than one country. (Revised effective 1/18/2009; 73 FR 78104 )(Revised effective 1/17/2009; 73 FR 76891 )  
    (iv) Reserved. (This paragraph has been redesignated as paragraph (h)(6)(viii) effective 1/18/2009; 73 FR 78104 )  
    (v) H-2A Petitions. Special criteria for admission, extension, and maintenance of status apply to H-2A petitions and are specified in paragraph (h)(5) of this section. The other provisions of §214.2(h) apply to H-2A only to the extent that they do not conflict with the special agricultural provisions in paragraph (h)(5) of this section.  


(3) Petition for registered nurse (H-1C)
    (i) General.  
        (A) For purposes of H-1C classification, the term "registered nurse" means a person who is or will be authorized by a State Board of Nursing to engage in registered nurse practice in a state or U.S. territory or possession, and who is or will be practicing at a facility which provides health care services. (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
        (B) A United States employer which provides health care services is referred to as a facility . A facility may file an H-1C petition for an alien nurse to perform the services of a registered nurse, if the facility meets the eligibility standards of 20 CFR 655.1111 and the other requirements of the Department of Labor's regulations in 20 CFR part 655, subpart L. (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
        (C) The position must involve nursing practice and require licensure or other authorization to practice as a registered nurse from the State Board of Nursing in the state of intended employment.  
        (D) A petition or application for change of status for an H-1C nurse may be filed and adjudicated only at the Vermont Service Center. (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
    (ii) [Reserved] (Removed and reserved 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
    (iii) Beneficiary requirements. An H-1C petition for a nurse shall be accompanied by evidence that the nurse: (Amended 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
        (A) Has obtained a full and unrestricted license to practice nursing in the country where the alien obtained nursing education, or has received nursing education in the United States; (Amended 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
        (B) Has passed the examination given by the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS), or has obtained a full and unrestricted (permanent) license to practice as a registered nurse in the state of intended employment, or has obtained a full and unrestricted (permanent) license in any state or territory of the United States and received temporary authorization to practice as a registered nurse in the state of intended employment; and (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
        (C) Is fully qualified and eligible under the laws (including such temporary or interim licensing requirements which authorize the nurse to be employed) governing the place of intended employment to practice as a registered nurse immediately upon admission to the United States, and is authorized under such laws to be employed by the employer. For purposes of this paragraph, the temporary or interim licensing may be obtained immediately after the alien enters the United States. (Revised 10/7/94; 59 FR 51101 )  
    (iv) Petitioner requirements. The petitioning facility shall submit the following with an H-1C petition: (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
        (A) A current copy of the DOL's notice of acceptance of the filing of its attestation on Form ETA 9081;  
        (B) A statement describing any limitations which the laws of the state or jurisdiction of intended employment place on the alien's services; and  
        (C) Evidence that the alien(s) named on the petition meets the definition of a registered nurse as defined at 8 CFR 214.2(h)(3)(i)(A) , and satisfies the requirements contained in section 212(m)(1) of the Act.  
    (v) Licensure requirements.  
        (A) A nurse who is granted H-1C classification based on passage of the CGFNS examination must, upon admission to the United States, be able to obtain temporary licensure or other temporary authorization to practice as a registered nurse from the State Board of Nursing in the state of intended employment. (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
        (B) A n alien who was admitted as an H-1C nonimmigrant on the basis of a temporary license or authorization to practice as a registered nurse must comply with the licensing requirements for registered nurses in the state of intended employment. An alien admitted as an H-1C nonimmigrant is required to obtain a full and unrestricted license if required by the state of intended employment. The Service must be notified pursuant to § 214.2(h)(11) when an H-1C nurse is no longer licensed as a registered nurse in the state of intended employment. (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 ) (Revised 10/7/94; 59 FR 51101 )  
        (C) A nurse shall automatically lose his or her eligibility for H-1C classification if he or she is no longer performing the duties of a registered professional nurse. Such a nurse is not authorized to remain in employment unless he or she otherwise receives authorization from the Service. (Amended 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 ) (Revised 10/7/94; 59 FR 51101 )  
        (D) Removed (6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
    (vi) Other requirements.  
        (A) If the Secretary of Labor notifies the Service that a facility which employs H-1C nonimmigrant nurses has failed to meet a condition in its attestation, or that there was a misrepresentation of a material fact in the attestation, the Service shall not approve petitions for H-1C nonimmigrant nurses to be employed by the facility for a period of at least 1 year from the date of receipt of such notice. The Secretary of Labor shall make a recommendation with respect to the length of debarment. If the Secretary of Labor recommends a longer period of debarment, the Service will give considerable weight to that recommendation. (Revised 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
        (B) If the facility's attestation expires, or is suspended or invalidated by DOL, the Service will not suspend or revoke the facility's approved petitions for nurses, if the facility has agreed to comply with the terms of the attestation under which the nurses were admitted or subsequent attestations accepted by DOL for the duration of the nurse's authorized stay.  
 


(4) Petition for alien to perform services in a specialty occupation, services relating to a DOD cooperative research and development project or coproduction project, or services of distinguished merit and ability in the field of fashion modeling (H-1B) .    
    (i)(A) Types of H-1B classification. An H-1B classification may be granted to an alien who:  
        (1) Will perform services in a specialty occupation which requires theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge and attainment of a baccalaureate or higher degree or its equivalent as a minimum requirement for entry into the occupation in the United States, and who is qualified to perform services in the specialty occupation because he or she has attained a baccalaureate or higher degree or its equivalent in the specialty occupation;  
        (2) Based on reciprocity, will perform services of an exceptional nature requiring exceptional merit and ability relating to a DOD cooperative research and development project or a coproduction project provided for under a Government-to-Government agreement administered by the Secretary of Defense;  
        (3) Will perf orm services in the field of fashion modeling and who is of distinguished merit and ability.  
    (B) General requirements for petitions involving a specialty occupation .  
        (1) Before filing a petition for H-1B classification in a specialty occupation, the petitioner shall obtain a certification from the Department of Labor that it has filed a labor condition application in the occupational specialty in which the alien(s) will be employed.  
        (2) Certification by the Department of Labor of a labor condition application in an occupational classification does not constitute a determination by that agency that the occupation in question is a specialty occupation. The director shall determine if the application involves a specialty occupation as defined in section 214(i)(1) of the Act. The director shall also determine whether the particular alien for whom H-1B classification is sought qualifies to perform services in the specialty occupation as prescribed in section 214(i)(2) of the Act.  
        (3) If all of the beneficiaries covered by an H-1B labor condition application have not been identified at the time a petition is filed, petitions for newly identified beneficiaries may be filed at any time during the validity of the labor condition application using photocopies of the same application. Each petition must refer by file number to all previously approved petitions for that labor condition application.  
        (4) When petitions have been approved for the total number of workers specified in the labor condition application, substitution of aliens against previously approved openings shall not be made. A new labor condition application shall be required.  
        (5) If t he Secretary of Labor notifies the Service that the petitioning employer has failed to meet a condition of paragraph (B) of section 212(n)(1) of the Act, has substantially failed to meet a condition of paragraphs (C) or (D) of section 212(n)(1) of the Act, has willfully failed to meet a condition of paragraph (A) of section 212(n)(1) of the Act, or has misrepresented any material fact in the application, the Service shall not approve petitions filed with respect to that employer under section 204 or 214(c) of the Act for a period of at least one year from the date of receipt of such notice.  
        (6) If the employer's labor condition application is suspended or invalidated by the Department of Labor, the Service will not suspend or revoke the employer's approved petitions for aliens already employed in specialty occupations if the employer has certified to the Department of Labor that it will comply with the terms of the labor condition application for the duration of the authorized stay of aliens it employs.  
    (C) General r equirements for petitions involving an alien of distinguished merit and ability in the field of fashion modeling .-- H-1B classification may be granted to an alien who is of distinguished merit and ability in the field of fashion modeling. An alien of distinguished merit and ability in the field of fashion modeling is one who is prominent in the field of fashion modeling. The alien must also be coming to the United States to perform services which require a fashion model of prominence.  
    (ii) Definitions.  
Prominence means a high level of achievement in the field of fashion modeling evidenced by a degree of skill and recognition substantially above that ordinarily encountered to the extent that a person described as prominent is renowned, leading, or well-known in the field of fashion modeling.  
Recognized authority means a person or an organization with expertise in a particular field, special skills or knowledge in that field, and the expertise to render the type of opinion requested. Such an opinion must state:  
        (1) The writer's qualifications as an expert;  
        (2) The writer's experience giving such opinions, citing specific instances where past opinions have been accepted as authoritative and by whom;  
        (3) How the conclusions were reached; and  
        (4) The basis for the conclusions supported by copies or citations of any research material used.  
Specialty occupation means an occupation which requires theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge in fields of human endeavor including, but not limited to, architecture, engineering, mathematics, physical sciences, social sciences, medicine and health, education, business specialties, accounting, law, theology, and the arts, and which requires the attainment of a bachelor's degree or higher in a specific specialty, or its equivalent, as a minimum for entry into the occupation in the Unite d States.  
United States employer means a person, firm, corporation, contractor, or other association, or organization in the United States which:  
        (1) Engages a person to work within the United States;  
        (2) Has an employer-employee relationship with respect to employees under this part, as indicated by the fact that it may hire, pay, fire, supervise, or otherwise control the work of any such employee; and  
        (3) Has an Internal Revenue Service Tax identification number.  
    (iii) Criteria for H-1B petitions involving a specialty occupation.  
        (A) Standards for specialty occupation position. To qualify as a specialty occupation, the position must meet one of the following criteria:  
            (1) A baccalaureate or higher degree or its equivalent is normally the minimum requirement for entry into the particular position;  
            (2) The degree requirement is common to the industry in parallel positions among similar organizations or, in the alternative, an employer may show that its particular position is so complex or unique that it can be performed only by an individual with a degree;  
            (3) The employer normally requires a degree or its equivalent for the position; or  
            (4) The nature of the sp ecific duties are so specialized and complex that knowledge required to perform the duties is usually associated with the attainment of a baccalaureate or higher degree.  
        (B) Petitioner requirements. The petitioner shall submit the following with an H-1B petition involving a specialty occupation:  
            (1) A certification from the Secretary of Labor that the petitioner has filed a labor condition application with the Secretary,  
            (2) A statement that it will comply with the terms of the labor condition application for the duration of the alien's authorized period of stay,  
            (3) Evidence that the alien qualifies to perform services in the specialty occupation as described in paragraph (h)(4)(iii)(A) of this section, and  
        (C) Beneficiary qualifications. To qualify to perform services in a specialty occupation, the alien must meet one of the following criteria:  
            (1) Hold a United States baccalaureate or higher degree required by the specialty occupation from an accredited college or university;  
            (2) Hold a foreign degree determined to be equivalent to a United States baccalaureate or higher degree required by the specialty occupation from an accredited college or university;  
            (3) Hold an unrestricted state license, registration or certification which authorizes him or her to fully practice the specialty occupation and be immediately engaged in that specialty in the state of intended employment; or  
            (4) Have education , specialized training, and/or progressively responsible experience that is equivalent to completion of a United States baccalaureate or higher degree in the specialty occupation, and have recognition of expertise in the specialty through progressively responsible positions directly related to the specialty.        


(D) Equivalence to completion of a college degree. For purposes of paragraph (h)(4)(iii)(C)( 4 ) of this section, equivalence to completion of a United States baccalaureate or higher degree shall mean achievement of a level of knowledge, competence, and practice in the specialty occupation that has been determined to be equal to that of an individual who has a baccalaureate or higher degree in the specialty and shall be determined by one or more of the following:  
            (1) An evaluation from an official who has authority to grant college-level credit for training and/or experience in the specialty at an accredited college or university which has a program for granting such credit based on an individual's training and/or work experience;  
            (2) The results of recognized college-level equivalency examinations or special credit programs, such as the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), or Program on Noncollegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI);  
            (3) An evaluation of education by a reliable credentials evaluation service which specializes in evaluating foreign educational credentials;  
            (4) Evidence of certification or registration from a nationally-recognized professional association or society for the specialty that is known to grant certification or registration to persons in the occupational specialty who have achieved a certain level of competence in the specialty;  
            (5) A determination by the Service that t he equivalent of the degree required by the specialty occupation has been acquired through a combination of education, specialized training, and/or work experience in areas related to the specialty and that the alien has achieved recognition of expertise in the specialty occupation as a result of such training and experience. For purposes of determining equivalency to a baccalaureate degree in the specialty, three years of specialized training and/or work experience must be demonstrated for each year of co llege-level training the alien lacks. For equivalence to an advanced (or Masters) degree, the alien must have a baccalaureate degree followed by at least five years of experience in the specialty. If required by a specialty, the alien must hold a Doctorate degree or its foreign equivalent. It must be clearly demonstrated that the alien's training and/or work experience included the theoretical and practical application of specialized knowledge required by the specialty occupation; that the alien's experi ence was gained while working with peers, supervisors, or subordinates who have a degree or its equivalent in the specialty occupation; and that the alien has recognition of expertise in the specialty evidenced by at least one type of documentation such as:  
                (i) Recognition of expertise in the specialty occupation by at least two recognized authorities in the same specialty occupation;  
                (ii) Membership in a recognized foreign or United States association or society in the specialty occupation;  
                (iii) Published material by or about the alien in professional publications, trade journals, books, or major newspapers;  
                (iv) Licensure or registration to practice the specialty occupation in a foreign country; or  
                (v) Achievements which a recognized authority has determined to be significant contributions to the field of t he specialty occupation.  
        (E) Liability for transportation costs. The employer will be liable for the reasonable costs of return transportation of the alien abroad if the alien is dismissed from employment by the employer before the end of the period of authorized admission pursuant to section 214(c)(5) of the Act. If the beneficiary voluntarily terminates his or her employment prior to the expiration of the validity of the petition, the alien has not been dismissed. If the beneficiary believes that the employer has not complied with this provision, the beneficiary shall advise the Service Center which adjudicated the petition in writing. The complaint will be retained in the file relating to the petition. Within the context of this paragraph, the term "abroad" refers to the alien's last place of fore ign residence. This provision applies to any employer whose offer of employment became the basis for an alien obtaining or continuing H-1B status.  
    (iv) General documentary requirements for H-1B classification in a specialty occupation . An H-1B petition involving a specialty occupation shall be accompanied by:          


(A) Documentation, certifications, affidavits, declarations, degrees, diplomas, writings, reviews, or any other required evidence sufficient to establish that the beneficiary is qualified to perform services in a specialty occupation as described in paragraph (h)(4)(i) of this section and that the services the beneficiary is to perform are in a specialty occupation. The evidence shall conform to the following:  
            (1) School records, diplomas, degrees, affidavits, declarations, contracts, and similar documentation submitted must reflect periods of attendance, courses of study, and similar pertinent data, be executed by the person in charge of the records of the educational or other institution, firm, or establishment where education or training was acquired.  
            (2) Affidavits or declarations made under penalty of perjury submitted by present or former employers or recognized authorities certifying as to the recognition and expertise of the beneficiary s hall specifically describe the beneficiary's recognition and ability in factual terms and must set forth the expertise of the affiant and the manner in which the affiant acquired such information.  
        (B) Copies of any written contracts between the petitioner and beneficiary, or a summary of the terms of the oral agreement under which the beneficiary will be employed, if there is no written contract.  
    (v) Licensure for H classification.  
        (A) General. If an occupation requires a state or local license for an individual to fully perform the duties of the occupation, an alien (except an H-1C nurse) seeking H classification in that occupation must have that license prior to approval of the petition to be found qualified to enter the United States and immediately engage in employment in the occupation. (Amended 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
        (B) Temporary licensure. If a temporary license is available and the alien is allowed to perform the duties of the occupation without a permanent license, the director shall examine the nature of the duties, the level at which the duties are performed, the degree of supervision received, and any limitations placed on the alien. If an analysis of the facts demonstrates that the alien under supervision is authorized to fully perform the duties of the occupation, H classification may be granted.  
        (C) Duties without licensure. In certain occupations which generally require licensure, a state may allow an individual to fully practice the occupation under the supervision of licensed senior or supervisory personnel in that occupation. In such cases, the director shall examine the nature of the duties and the level at which they are performed. If the facts demonstrate that the alien under supervision could fully perform the duties of the occupation, H classification may be granted.  
        (D) H-1C nurses . For purposes of licensure, H-1C nurses must provide the evidence required in paragraph (h)(3)(iii) of this section. (Amended 6/11/01; 66 FR 31107 )  
        (E) Limitation on approval of petition. Where licensure is required in any occupation, including registered nursing, the H petition may only be approved for a period of one year or for the period that the temporary license is valid, whichever is longer, unless the alien already has a permanent license to practice the occupation. An alien who is accorded H classification in an occupation which requires licensure may not be granted an extension of stay or accorded a new H classification after the one year unless he or she has obtained a permanent license in the state of intended employment or continues to hold a temporary license valid in the same state for the period of the requested extension.  
    (vi) Criteria and documentary requirements for H-1B petitions involving DOD cooperative research and development projects or coproduction projects.  
        (A) General.  
            (1) For purposes of H-1B classification, services of an exceptional nature relating to DOD cooperative research and development projects or coproduction projects shall be those services which require a baccalaureate or higher degree, or its equivalent, to perform the duties. The existence of this special program does not preclude the DOD from utilizing the regular H-1B provisions provided the required guidelines are met.  
(2) The requirements re lating to a labor condition application from the Department of Labor shall not apply to petitions involving DOD cooperative research and development projects or coproduction projects.  
        (B) Petitioner requirements.  
            (1) The petition must be accompanied by a verification letter from the DOD project manager for the particular project stating that the alien will be working on a cooperative research and development project or a coproduction project under a reciprocal Government-to-Government agreement administered by DOD. Details about the specific project are not required.  
            (2) The petitioner shall provide a general description of the alien's duties on the particular project and indicate the actual dates of the alien's employment on the project.  
            (3) The petitioner sha ll submit a statement indicating the names of aliens currently employed on the project in the United States and their dates of employment. The petitioner shall also indicate the names of aliens whose employment on the project ended within the past year.  
        (C) Beneficiary requirement. The petition shall be accompanied by evidence that the beneficiary has a baccalaureate or higher degree or its equivalent in the occupational field in which he or she will be performing services in accordance with paragraph (h)(4)(iii)(C) and/or (h)(4)(iii)(D) of this section.  
    (vii) Criteria and documentary requirements for H-1B petitions for aliens of distinguished merit and ability in the field of fashion modeling. --  
        (A) General. Prominence in the field of fashion modeling may be established in the case of an individual fashion model. The work which a prominent alien is coming to perform in the United States must require the services of a prominent alien. A petition for an H-1B alien of distinguished merit and ability in the field of fashion modeling shall be accompanied by:  
            (1) Documentation, certifications, affidavits, writings, reviews, or any other required evidence sufficient to establish that the beneficiary is a fashion model of distinguished merit and ability. Affidavits submitted by present or former employers or recognized experts certifying to the recognition and distinguished ability of the beneficiary shall specifically describe the beneficiary's recognition and ability in factual terms and must set forth the expertise of the affiant and the manner in which the affiant acquired such information.  
            (2) Copies of any written contracts between the petitioner and beneficiary, or a summary of the terms of the oral agreement under which the beneficiary will be employed, if there is no written contract.  
        (B) Petitioner's requirements. To establish that a position requires prominence, the petitioner must establish that the position meets one of the following criteria:  
            (1) The services to be performed involve events or productions which have a distinguished reputation;  
            (2) The services are to be performed for an organization or establishment that has a distinguished reputation for, or record of, employing prominent persons.  
        (C) Beneficiary's requirements . A petitioner may establish that a beneficiary is a fashion model of distinguished merit and ability by the submission of two of the following forms of documentation showing that the alien: (Revised 8/15/94; 59 FR 41818 - 41842 )  
            (1) Has achieved national or international recognition and acclaim for outstanding achievement in his or her field as evidenced by reviews in major newspapers, trade journals, magazines, or other published material;  
            (2) Has performed and will perform services as a fashion model for employers with a distinguished reputation;  
            (3) Has received recognition for significant achievements from organizations, critics, fashion houses, modeling agencies, or other recognized experts in the field; or  
            (4) Commands a high salary or other substantial remuneration for services evidenced by contracts or other reliable evidence.  
    (viii) Criteria and documentary requirements for H-1B petitions for physicians. -  
        (A) Beneficiary's requirements. An H-1B petition for a physician shall be accompanied by evidence that the physician:  
            (1) Has a license or other authorization required by the state of intended employment to practice medicine, or is exempt by law therefrom, if the physician will perform direct patient care and the state requires the license or authorization, and  
            (2) Has a full and unrestricted license to practice medicine in a foreign state or has graduated from a medical school in the United States or in a foreign state.  
        (B) Petitioner's requirements. The petitioner must establish that the alien physician:  
            (1) Is coming to the United States primarily to teach or conduct research, or both, at or for a public or nonprofit private educational or research institution or agency, and that no patient care will be performed, except that which is incidental to the physician's teaching or research; or  
            (2) The alien has passed the Federation Licensing Examination (or an equivalent examination as determined by the Secretary of Health and Human Services) or is a graduate of a United States medical school; and  
                (i) Has competency in oral and written English which shall be demonstrated by the passage of the English language proficiency test given by the Educational  Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates; or  
                (ii) Is a graduate of a school of medicine accredited by a body or bodies approved for that purpose by the Secretary of Education.  
        (C) Exception for physicians of national or international renown. A physician who is a graduate of a medical school in a foreign state and who is of national or international renown in the field of medicine is exempt from the requirements of paragraph (h)(4)(viii)(B) of this section. 


 This information can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations.

Nonimmigrant Visas: