Cross-Chargeability

I am working on H-1B. This week, I got my I-140 petition approved that was filed in EB2. I am Indian citizen born in India. My marriage is scheduled to happen in Jan, 2015. The girl is citizen of India and was born in Nepal. I have heard that after marriage, I would be eligible to file I-485 for both myself and my (then) wife, based on cross-chargeability rules.
1: Is my eligibility to file I-485 (based on the birth country of wife) and its approval thereafter dependent on discretion of USCIS? If yes, does USCIS generally approve or deny such I-485 petitions filed on the basis of cross chargeability rules?
2: Is there any reason due to which my wife and I would be denied from filing I-485 and there-after getting an approval of I-485 (leaving aside fraud matters)?
3: My fiancée is yet to get her passport made in India. I found that my fiancée does not have her birth certificate from Nepal. Is a birth certificate the only way to prove location of birth? If she gets her birth certificate made now, Does the USCIS create issues about a birth certificate made so many years after birth?
4: In my scenario (EB2 petition, primary applicant India born, wife Nepal born Indian citizen), How long (approximately) after filing I-485 would it take to get the green card?

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ANSWER: 
See clip from Attorney Rajiv S. Khanna's conference call video that addresses this question. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujMQ79pgzX8

FAQ Transcript

Here is the situation. What is Cross-Chargeability? Let me explain. Normally when we do analysis which country quota do you belong to for your employment based Green Cards we go by your country of birth. If you are born in India and you are citizen of Japan, you are still going to be charge to India not Japan. If however, your wife is born in third country in Japan you are born in India but your wife is born in Japan, you can be charge to Japan that is called Cross Charge-ability. That is very useful thing to have, because all of sudden from a heavily backed up country you go to country where dates are current. 
So the problem is she is born in Nepal but does not have the birth certificate. Before I go to the birth certificate question, let me go one by one. First is, does USCIS have discretion to deny such cases? Or do they have to give me the Cross charge-ability? The answer is they have to give the cross chargeability. This is not the question of discretion; they are not doing any favors. Once you meet the requirements and you can prove it you are entitled to your cross charge-ability. You cannot be denied your I-485 for this reason.
Now, she does not have the birth certificate from Nepal. Birth certificate is the only way to prove the location of birth, it gets tricky. In normal circumstances if you don't have a birth certificate what you will do is you will get a certificate of non availability from the village Panchayat or Municipal corporation where she is born saying that her birth is never recorded. Then you will get two affidavits from people like her parents, who say that we know that she is born on this date, this place. In areas of cross charge-ability USCIS may require further evidence. It can be any evidence about where she lived in Nepal, things like that but if you try to register her birth now that's not going to happen.
So if you do go through the cross charge-ability and your dates are “current” typically your Green Card should be done within a year.
Nonimmigrant Visas: 
Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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